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Photos from the second annual Antagonistics Weekend, July 28-29, 2012

Our second annual Antagonistics Weekend with Professor Mark P. Donnelly was a great success! Saturday's workshop focused on close-range Ju Jutsu and introductory Vigny cane, and on Sunday we continued on to partnered Vigny practice as well as a bit of savate. We registered 34 participants across both days, with 6-10 people returning for both days of training. Photographs from the event are below; since these are for instructional purposes, to assist our study group training and provide curriculum, the photos are all of Professor Donnelly and his students from his Keystone Academy of Duelling and Swordsmansip demonstrating Bartitsu principles.

[Bartitsu Club of NYC July 2012 Seminars with Mark P. Donnelly]
Most of Sunday's class is pictured here; a few students had to leave early.

[Bartitsu Club of NYC July 2012 Seminars with Mark P. Donnelly]
A brief verbal introduction to Bartitsu at the beginning of Sunday's class

[Bartitsu Club of NYC June 2011]
A simple drill to demonstrate that if your assailant pushes you, you must not take more than one step in any direction if you want to slip away. The professor demonstrated this principle with me (Rachel), and I ended up halfway across the room because I continually stepped backwards in one direction!

[Bartitsu Club of NYC June 2011]
Vigny parries on Sunday
[Bartitsu Club of NYC June 2011]
The professor's students John (pictured here) and Rob kindly came to NYC to help out at the seminar. Here the professor demonstrates an arm lock - note how John's stick is part of the leverage.

[Bartitsu Club of NYC June 2011]
Vigny parries and counterattacks on Sunday
[Bartitsu Club of NYC July 2012 Seminars with Mark P. Donnelly]
The "stop" drill that is generally part of the professor's "Intro to Bartitsu" workshops. He has taught this at Steampunk World's Fair. It demonstrates how Barton-Wright's principle of "disturbing the equilibrium" may be psychological rather than physical.
[Bartitsu Club of NYC June 2011]
Vigny cane on Sunday - using the end rather than the weighted tip of the cane, also an elbow lock

[Bartitsu Club of NYC June 2011]
It's a little hard to see what's happening behind John's back, but I can see that the professor has his stick - possibly this was a counter to a strike or grab

[Bartitsu Club of NYC June 2011]
Arm lock and cane thrust submitting the opponent
[Bartitsu Club of NYC June 2011]
Vigny cane on Sunday with wrist/elbow lock

[Bartitsu Club of NYC June 2011]
Looks like a one-handed throttle, but the professor's right hand and John's left are not visible

[Bartitsu Club of NYC June 2011]
This is a very painful trapping/locking movement from which it would be more or less impossible to escape without breaking your own arm or throttling yourself. It is a neat illustration of all the canonical Barton-Wright curriculum in which he describes trapping an assailant until a constable can be summoned.
[Bartitsu Club of NYC July 2012 Seminars with Mark P. Donnelly]
Crook cane work against the ankle, for which timing is important (if the foot is already planted, no use trying to move it with the crook)
[Bartitsu Club of NYC June 2011]
Here the professor is explaining that even if the crook does not fit all the way around the neck, it can still be very painful and force compliance

[Bartitsu Club of NYC June 2011]
Although I didn't capture a photo of the completed movement, during this segment, the professor demonstrated what some call a "sleeper hold," others a "blood choke" - just simple pressure against the carotid arteries which, if held long enough, will cause the person to momentarily lose consciousness. It's actually a non-lethal technique when applied correctly, and much safer than so-called air chokes.

[Bartitsu Club of NYC June 2011]
Parrying blows with the parasol/umbrella.
[Bartitsu Club of NYC June 2011]
The tallest gent in the room was solicited for this demonstration of trapping and locking limbs with the crook cane

[Bartitsu Club of NYC June 2011]
The professor explained that the crook can also be used for striking




[Bartitsu Club of NYC June 2011]
We learned the coup de pied bas during the savate portion of instruction
[Bartitsu Club of NYC July 2012 Seminars with Mark P. Donnelly]
Although it looks as if we are learning pugilism, it was actually savate - just hard to capture savate kicks in photos!
[Bartitsu Club of NYC June 2011]
A brief explanation of "purring," a traditional shin-kicking game from the Cotswolds
[Bartitsu Club of NYC June 2011]
Purring and savate demonstrations
[Bartitsu Club of NYC July 2012 Seminars with Mark P. Donnelly]
An explanation of using the feet to purr the shins to create an escape during a close grapple