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Photos from the May 2017 Shillelagh Workshop with Maxime Chouinard

No weapon is more strongly associated with Ireland than the shillelagh (also called bataireacht or boiscin), an Anglicization of the Irish word sailéille, a wooden walking stick made from stout knotty stick with a large knob at the top, used as a cudgel both in settling gentlemanly disputes between individuals as well as in clan fighting and other combatives in Ireland, where stick fighting has been practiced for centuries. Irish customs made their way to the New World, and in mid-19th century Manhattan, the Five Points was a hotbed of Irish factions angling for criminal and political power - the infamous "Gangs of New York." The style that was taught at the workshop is called Antrim Stick. It is a traditional style from Northern Ireland, which dates from at least the 19th century. It is an efficient style focusing on speed and adaptability. The stick is used in every range and in multiple situations. The style also contains techniques using different size of sticks, as well as using kicks, grabs and punches.

[Bartitsu Club of NYC March 2013 Travel Channel film shoot]
The class in their best fierce faction fighter pose

[Bartitsu Club of NYC March 2013 Travel Channel film shoot]
Light free sparring towards the end of class

[Bartitsu Club of NYC March 2013 Travel Channel film shoot]
Light free sparring towards the end of class

[Bartitsu Club of NYC March 2013 Travel Channel film shoot]
Getting our Irish on!

[Bartitsu Club of NYC March 2013 Travel Channel film shoot]
At the beginning of a faction fight, the two best fighters from either side faced off, which sometimes led to the death of one or the other. Patrick convincingly feigns death throes.

[Bartitsu Club of NYC March 2013 Travel Channel film shoot]
The class in goofy pose, just for fun

[Bartitsu Club of NYC March 2013 Travel Channel film shoot]
Post-training dinner and drinks at Lillie's, our unofficial clubhouse

[Bartitsu Club of NYC March 2013 Travel Channel film shoot]
Post-training dinner at Lillie's Irish Victorian restaurant, where an Irish string band greeted us appopriately.